Category Archives: you ask for it and ill find it out

2017 – 5th Annual Chocolate Challenge – Gournet warehouse 


This April 27th at 6:30 the Gourmet warehouse hosts the ever popular Chocolate Challenge. 


This worthy event is not simply a reason to get together and eat Chocolate (though that is a side benefit) but rather a ongoing generous effort to support the community and the kids. 

The focus on ensuring that the local children can Have access to healthy food in the weekends supplementing there school food programs – the Strathcona Back Pack Program now feeds over 350 kids / families every week.

Click here for the website
The second program and one that theory that I completely subscribe to is Project Chef – this is a school program that is aimed at teaching kids how to cook and enjoy nutritious meals. This enables the kids how to make good choices and gives them the tools and confidence how to prepare their own great dishes. 

Teach our kids to eat and create a healthier society! 

Some of our top pastry chef / chocolatiers will be offering you a taste of their talented culinary magic and submitting their creation for your vote! 

This list includes 

Barefoot Bistro

Chez Christophe

Greg Hook – Choclate Arts

Peter Fong – Ganache Patisserie 

Okanagan College 

Purdy’s Chocolate 

Steve Hodge – Temper Pastry 

Thomas Haas 

With other tasty goodies and sips from Earnest Ice cream, the Preservatory, Stumptown coffe, Tacimo, Tartine Tarta, Terra Breads and Yorkshire tea.

If that isn’t enough you have access to great deals at Vancouvers own Culinary Disneyland at your disposal! 

I promise you that this is a great event and full of great flavors with good company! 

Buy your tickets here and support a great cause

You gotta try this! 

Everything we love about Italy ! 


Happy Sunday great foodie friends, 

This is a great short piece but long enough to make your mouth water and remind you how Italians influence (and beautifully by the way) the culinary world! 


Enjoy! 

Cook with your Kids & Family- eat real food 


Happy Monday great foodie friends.

The more I see what people consider food (especially the young and young families) the more I realize that we as a society need to get back to the basics. 

Don’t get me wrong, fast food every once in a while should be ok but making it the rule vs. the exception  begs the term “You are what you eat”.

I fully realize how busy life is and that time is short and a rare comoddity for most families but in some way or another through the generations one could always say the family is busy. 

Let’s look at this way, planning and learning are the keys to what I am proposing.

  1. Stay to the outer 4 walls of the grocery store.
  2. Watch cooking shows or look through cookbooks and plan out at least 5 meals for the week. 
  3. Go to farmers markets 
  4. A lot of foods or meals freeze well so you can make it ahead.
  5. Reduce refined sugars, salts and msg loaded seasoning. There are easy recipes to create your own seasoning, sea salts and healthy herbs that will make your foods taste much better.
  6. Do all of this with your kids! 

When you cook with your family it brings us back to our roots. Think about the “family” meal and sitting around the table with friends. It’s what connects us as people and what feeds our soul as well as our bodies. 

Teaching the young that hamburgers and French fires are not the healthiest way to eat but rather roasting a fresh chicken and serving it fresh vegetables are the “norm” will pay off for the future. 

Please don’t take this as a lecture but rather a friendly nudge to remember to learn where your food comes from. Make things fresh ahead that you can incorporate in your weekly meals (pasta sauce, chicken, beef or vegetable broths) and watch how you reconnect with your family and friends as you sit together, cook together and laugh together.

You gotta try this! 

10 Food Myths that are hurting your kids! – brought to us by the Washington post 



Here are 10 common myths that mischaracterize vegetables — followed by facts about why these vegetables are worth a place on your child’s plate.
10 food myths that are hurting your kids

By Casey Seidenberg Wellness, January 19
A fellow mom recently asked me whether cucumbers and celery really count as green vegetables. She had heard they don’t offer much nutritional value because they are mostly water, so she figured she shouldn’t worry about encouraging her children to eat them.
Great question. But although these vegetables might not be the MVPs of the nutrition game (we’ll leave that to the dark leafy greens), they all have a place on the team.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says children, depending on age and activity, should eat one to three cups of vegetables every day (and nine out of 10 American kids don’t get enough). This is a significant amount, so perhaps we shouldn’t so hastily dismiss those cucumbers.

The truth is, all vegetables count toward the CDC recommendation, as they all provide health benefits — just in different concentration.

Here are 10 common myths that mischaracterize vegetables — followed by facts about why these vegetables are worth a place on your child’s plate.
1. Cabbage: Just a cheap meal filler

Cabbage may be inexpensive, but it is not ineffective. Part of the cruciferous family of vegetables that includes kale, cauliflower, broccoli and Brussels sprouts, cabbage is high in fiber for healthy digestion and satiety, vitamin C for the immune system and the absorption of iron, vitamin K for healthy blood and circulation, and cancer-fighting compounds.

2. Carrots: Too much sugar

Yes, my daughter likes to pretend she is a bunny when she eats her carrots, but this vegetable isn’t just for pets or kids. Carrots contain high amounts of vitamin A for eyesight and immunity, vitamin C for that strong immune system, and fiber. As for its natural sugar, the fiber in a carrot slows down the absorption, so there is a much smaller effect on one’s blood sugar.

3. Corn: Source of high-fructose syrup

High-fructose corn syrup has certainly damaged corn’s reputation, but the vegetable and the sweetener have little in common. All of the nutrition and healthy fiber in the corn plant has been stripped from the syrup. Corn is a high-carbohydrate vegetable, so it shouldn’t be the only one your child eats. But it provides thiamine that helps convert carbohydrates into energy, heart-healthy folate, and antioxidants to help fight disease. Much of the conventional corn in the United States grows from genetically modified seeds, so buying organic — always a good idea in the vegetable world — is especially recommended.
[In defense of corn, the world’s most important food crop]

4. Cucumbers: Nothing but water

Yes, cucumbers are 95 percent water, helping our bodies stay hydrated in hot temperatures, but they also provide antioxidants such as vitamin C and beta-carotene that help us fight cellular damage, B vitamins that support nerve health, potassium for heart health, and fiber.

5. Celery: Ditto

Celery is not just a tool to stir a bloody mary or an accompaniment for chicken wings. The vegetable provides vitamin K for blood health, folate for red blood cell production, vitamin A, fiber and yes, lots of water. Celery has been shown to lower blood pressure and the risk of cancer.

6. Garlic: Flavor but no nutrition

Known in ancient times (and in horror movies) as a tool to ward off witches and vampires, in modern times garlic is equally as powerful at keeping us healthy. This vegetable has been shown to lower blood pressure, protect the heart, fight cancer and regulate blood sugar levels and is antibacterial and antiviral, which means it is helpful during cold and flu season.

7. Onions: Ditto

Never say no to an onion, especially during allergy season. Onions are high in quercetin, an antioxidant known for being a natural antihistamine. Onions have also been shown to support heart health, and they provide vitamin C, calcium, iron, folate and fiber.

8. Iceberg lettuce: No flavor or nutrition

More than a vehicle for blue cheese dressing, iceberg lettuce can provide a significant portion of the daily requirement of vitamin K to keep our blood and bones strong and vitamin A for our eyesight and immunity. Yes, darker varieties of lettuces and greens provide more nutrition per serving, but if iceberg will get your kid to eat a salad, embrace it.
9. Parsley: Just a garnish

What a waste that this herb is most often used as a disposable garnish, because ounce per ounce, parsley has 33 times the amount of vitamin C, 16 times the amount of vitamin K, six times the amount of iron and four times the amount of calcium as lettuce. Oh, and don’t forget the folate, fiber and water.
Known in ancient times (and in horror movies) as a tool to ward off witches and vampires, in modern times garlic is equally as powerful at keeping us healthy. This vegetable has been shown to lower blood pressure, protect the heart, fight cancer and regulate blood sugar levels and is antibacterial and antiviral, which means it is helpful during cold and flu season.

7. Onions: Ditto

Never say no to an onion, especially during allergy season. Onions are high in quercetin, an antioxidant known for being a natural antihistamine. Onions have also been shown to support heart health, and they provide vitamin C, calcium, iron, folate and fiber.
8. Iceberg lettuce: No flavor or nutrition

More than a vehicle for blue cheese dressing, iceberg lettuce can provide a significant portion of the daily requirement of vitamin K to keep our blood and bones strong and vitamin A for our eyesight and immunity. Yes, darker varieties of lettuces and greens provide more nutrition per serving, but if iceberg will get your kid to eat a salad, embrace it.
9. Parsley: Just a garnish

What a waste that this herb is most often used as a disposable garnish, because ounce per ounce, parsley has 33 times the amount of vitamin C, 16 times the amount of vitamin K, six times the amount of iron and four times the amount of calcium as lettuce. Oh, and don’t forget the folate, fiber and water.

10. Potatoes: Fattening

Potatoes have a bad reputation as either a french fry or a nutritionless white carb, when in fact they provide twice as much potassium as a banana, vitamin B6 for nerves and mood, vitamin C and fiber. Potatoes have a high glycemic index, which means they can affect blood sugar, but that alone shouldn’t convict the vegetable. A person with blood sugar issues, diabetes or weight problems might want to limit their potato intake, but the rest of us should enjoy them in moderation to reap their vitamin and mineral benefits. But watch out for those fries — you’ll also be getting unhealthful fats.

“You Gotta Read This” 
Full story here about the 10 myth foods

Cinco De Mayo 


Happy Cinco De Mayo ! 


Although most of my Mexican friends say that Cinco De Mayo is really a day to celebrate created by the rest of North America and not really the same celebration in Mexico (though it is a day off from work!) it is a good reason to enjoy good food, good chocolate (thank you to the Mayan Culture for Chocolate!) and great coffee with friends!

Enjoy the fantastic celebrations & libations of the day but be safe safe and take care of your friends! 

Look for the special treats offered around Vancouver and share with us the great treats that you find! Pictures would be great and I will share them with a follow up post! 

Here are a few pictures of great things to search out:


And don’t for get the chocolate terrine or cafe! 

Have a great day! happy Cinco De Mayo! 

McHappy Day 


Happy McHappy Day  everyone! 


Please get out today or online and  support this great cause. The proceeds from the sale of Big Macs and hot coffees / happy meals go towards the Ronald McDonald House Charities and bring more joy to families through the toughest time one could ever imagine. 

Even if you aren’t a fast food lover the cause is bigger than that and you could donate directly if that is your wish through the link below.


Click here to donate on the McDonalds site
This cause can’t be underestimated as the dollars generated go directly to where it says! The Ronald Macdonald House Charities 

Support the cause please and bring comfort to those who most need it at a terribly challenging time in children and families lives. 

“You Gotta do this!”

Top 10 Recipes Googled in 2015- according to Food Network and a Happy New year! 


First I wanted to thank you for following Bcfoodieblogger and wish the happiest New Years and a healthy and prosporous 2016! 

I just wanted to share this posting from Food Network and Google. Some recipes make sense that they were the most searched and some didn’t make as much sense but then we really must think about worldwide culinary thoughts and not just our little but most delicious culinary dinseyland called Vancouver and the Lowermainland.

Most googled recipes in 2015 -click here
What were the most-searched recipes on Google this year? The powerful search engine has unveiled the results of the top 10 recipes that users have been searching for. You may be surprised by the results — and you’d never guess what tops the list as 2015’s most-Googled recipe!

1. Apple Roses

Google users were obsessed with this year’s most-searched recipe, in which thin apple slices are arranged to resemble the petals of a rose within puff pastry, and then baked to golden-brown perfection to result in a delicate, delicious dessert that looks far more complicated than it actually is.

  
2. Rice Krispies Squares

Rice Krispie squares remain an easy-to-make, kid-friendly treat, so it shouldn’t be surprising that recipes for this popular snack were Google’s #2 search in 2015, with the Internet serving up a nearly endless supply of variations. Among them, this spectacular version that adds peanut butter and chocolate to the mix.

  
3. Osso Bucco

Don’t try to figure out why the third most popular Google search was for Osso Bucco recipes, as this iconic Italian dish is apparently more popular than ever. In this recipe, Chef Ricardo Larrivée gussies up this classic favourite by adding the sweetness of orange and prunes.

  
4. Chili

Everybody loves a bowl of hearty chili, and Internet users searched up a storm looking for recipes. If you’re looking to cook up a pot of zesty chili, you won’t go wrong with this spicy and savoury recipe from Bobby Flay.

Get the recipe for Bobby Flay’s Red Beef Chili.

  
5. Hollandaise Sauce

Hollandaise sauce is apparently making a comeback, judging by its status according to Google searches, and Chef Michael Smith offers up his version of this creamy classic, which he uses to top gently steamed asparagus.
Get the recipe for Michael Smith’s Asparagus Hollandaise.

  
6. Puffed Wheat Squares

Puffed wheat squares are a kid-approved favourite that don’t require a whole lot of effort to make, and Google has numerous recipes to provide such as this easy-to-follow recipe.
Get the recipe for Puffed Wheat Squares.

  

7. Spaghetti Bolognese

One of the most iconic Italian pasta dishes out there, spaghetti Bolognese is a hearty crowd-pleaser that is always welcome on the dinner table. No need to Google when you can use this authentic Bolognese recipe from Chuck Hughes.
Get the recipe for Chuck Hughes’ Bolognese.

  
8. Beer Can Burger

Following in the tradition of beer can chicken, the latest beer can barbecue craze involves pressing an aluminum can into a huge, baseball-sized sphere of ground meat (a half-pound or more), with the resulting indentation used as a vessel to stuff cheese, bacon or whatever toppings you like before grilling it up.
Get the recipe for Smoked Beer Can Burgers.

  
9. Lasagna

Lasagna remains a go-to staple for busy families, a casserole-like pasta dish that everyone loves and, as a bonus, can be prepared ahead of time and then heated up for dinner. If anyone knows a thing or two about cooking an amazing lasagna, it’s Giada de Laurentiis, who adds the rich, sweet flavour of butternut squash to her recipe.
Get the recipe for Giada de Laurentiis’ Butternut Squash Lasagna.

  

10. Mashed Potatoes

It seems as if 2015 was the year that everybody wanted to spice up their mashed potatoes, whether it was for Thanksgiving or simply to serve up a more creative version of this popular side. In this recipe, Ree Drummond gets back to the basics with her creamy, whipped version of savoury spuds.
Get the recipe for Ree Drummond’s Creamy Mashed Potatoes.

  
Click on the Food Network link above for the original article and link to the recipes.

 Make 2016 a year when you challenge yourself in the kitchen to try new recipes, make them your own and share a meal with family and friends. Remember that the Kitchen table is where we sit and share and is the second heart and soul of the home to your mothers. Sharing a meal connects us and helps us bond, and it has been that way since the beginning of time.

Have fun tonight, enjoy your transition from 2015 to 2016 and stay safe…find a ride home if you need to and wake up tomorrow with a refreshed outlook on the start of a new year.

Thank you again for following my blog and I hope to bring you more reasons to continue next year. Anyone interested in a new “E-cookbook”? 

Cheers. 

Sauder research-Foodies more satisfied with their lives 


Research | Foodies more satisfied with their lives

December 9, 2015Tagged: All News, Faculty, Press Release, Research

Thank you Sauder and Yann Cornil and Pierre Chandon for the enlightening view on eating for the right reasons.

  
People who revel in the tastes, sights and scents of food report higher well-being than those who eat simply to satisfy their hunger, according to a new study from UBC’s Sauder School of Business.

The researchers also found that having a deeper appreciation doesn’t lead to extra pounds, finding there is no correlation between idealizing food and above-average body mass.

“Here in North America, we’re in a society that considers food to be the new tobacco – and that’s the wrong approach,” said Assistant Professor Yann Cornil, the lead author of the study. “Eating pleasure does not need to be the enemy of a healthy lifestyle. Instead, we should help people appreciate all that’s beautiful about food, and build up more of a food culture.”
Cornil and his co-author defined eating pleasure as being either epicurean – the full sensory experience – or visceral – satisfying an impulse . The pair surveyed people to determine how they enjoyed food, and then surveyed them about their general well-being and tendencies to overeat. They compared this data with body mass index of the participants.
Epicureans scored higher on well-being, had less interest in large servings and were equally distributed across the body mass index. The researchers also found epicureans can’t be stereotyped, as they were evenly distributed across age, income and education levels.
Cornil says his findings could inform public health campaigns that too often demonize rich or fatty foods as leading to high rates of obesity and diabetes.
“Loving food doesn’t mean you’re going to eat too much of it – it depends on the kind of pleasure you derive from it,” he said.
“If you eat to satisfy your impulses, then you’re more likely to overindulge and eat large portions mindlessly. But if we teach people to appreciate food for its aesthetics, its symbolism and its rich flavours, then their first bite will the best one, and they’ll be more likely to choose smaller portions.”
The study, “Pleasure as an ally of healthy eating? Contrasting visceral and Epicurean eating pleasure and their association with portion size preferences and wellbeing,” by Yann Cornil and Pierre Chandon, is forthcoming in the journal Appetite.

Link – click here to go directly to the Sauder posting
If you want to know some other great foodies to follow and watch please let me know what region that you live in and I would be pleased to pass on some of the top foodies to help  suggest some great spots to eat or for some great suggestions for some wow recipes to try! 

You Gotta see This! 

Follow me on Twitter @BCfoodieblogger or Instagram @bcfoodieblogger 

The 9 Highest-Calorie Meals at chain restaurants – brought to us by Health News & Views 


Are you ready for this?! 

  
Health News & Views 9 highest calorie meals at Restaurant Chains

You Gotta See This !!

Study pegs value of food reviews 


Happy Wesnesday great foodie friends – 

Found a great article from Sauder Business School – UBC on 24 hours News. 

This is exactly what drove me to food reviews as it is a tool I have always used. Further to that you get to know different writers in different areas who you feel are honest and real to their word reviewers with culinary knowledge.

Thank you Michael Mui and 24 Hrs. As well as Marketing Professor Chunhua Wu out of the Sauder School of Business at UBC 

   
 It’s your first time travelling to a new place — say, Vancouver — and you’re looking for somewhere to eat. And since you don’t have anyone to ask, chances are good the search will take you to a food review website.
This is the idea that led marketing professor Chunhua Wu, out of the Sauder School of Business at UBC, to figure out just how much value restaurants get out of these reviews.
And if you were a new person in Vancouver searching online, his findings suggest that the search just contributed $1.50 to the local restaurant economy.
To arrive at that conclusion, however, Wu had to find people regularly using these sites, and how many actually visited the restaurants after reading the reviews.
His answers were found in Dianping.com, the largest consumer review website in China, which gives users discount cards if they check in to an eatery.
The findings suggested 15% of the users actually showed up to eat shortly after reading the reviews, based on about 5,000 users’ browsing habits for the top seven hotpot restaurants in Shanghai.
At those restaurants, the average person is likely to spend $17 (prices converted from Chinese currency), and Wu calculated how much value each review reader, on average, contributes to the restaurants’ incomes, regardless if someone shows up — it was about $1.50.
“We found it’s very interesting there’s so many online reviews but we don’t know whether consumers value this, or whether it would change the profitability of restaurants,” he said.
“If you have 200 potential customers looking at your (review) website today, if you have really high consistent ratings, it will give you 200 times $1.50.”
The study is limited, however, in finding out how different types of reviews might impact whether customers show up, since he picked only the top restaurants.
“The content is more important than the rating … it contains more information than just the numerical ratings, people read the messages and try to figure out how it can fit their own taste,” Wu said.
Other questions include whether score ratings are consistent — if they aren’t, customers might not trust the review.
Things like the “star status” of a reviewer and their accuracy also matter, as do the number of upvotes given to reviews considered more “useful” than others.
Ian Tostenson, president of the B.C. Restaurant and Food Services Association, agreed with the author that reviews are more likely to matter if tourists are reading them.
“The emphasis is on people if they are travelling to places, where there’s no reference point. They’re looking for something they feel is an independent point of information. They don’t have friends, they don’t have anyone to tell them — those online reviews, in that case, work better,” he said.
All told, the average total each of the seven restaurants got out of people reading reviews was about $7,300 per year.